Brenda Carter | A Proven Leader !
Educated ! | Experienced ! | Passionate !
Elect
Brenda Carter 
State Representative District 29

Roads and Infrastructure

My focus on our environment runs deep.  Michigan has the largest source of fresh water in North America, yet our lakes are being polluted at an alarming rate.  It is our ecosystem. Our ecosystem supports all life. But it's more than having fresh drinking water, and soil that can produce food that is not genetically modified. It is our entire economic system.
Our ecosystem supports our marine life.  Our marine life supports our fishing and tourist industries. Our inland lakes and rivers are contaminated and many of the corporations are not held accountable.  The water in the Flint River was contaminated by local industries. Now, over 100,000 residents are permanently affected by a selfish decision to switch the drinking water from a reliable source to one of the high lead levels.  Contamination of our soil from fracking combined with polluting our lakes, rivers, and streams leave little for our future generations. 
I was part of a group of volunteers who took bottled water to Flint. Our group went into the poorest sections of Flint to find that they had not received water.  I was touched very deeply when I saw a cat looking for water to drink. Did anyone put any thought into how one failed legislative decision would affect generations of life? Are the legislators thinking about how their decision to stop bottled water distribution in Flint will affect the people now? Does anyone in our state know how safe their drinking water is?  Who is making these decisions, and why are they not being held accountable? Our residents in Michigan deserve better.
I've always opposed fracking because of the destabilization of our geological rock formation resulting in earthquakes.  There are more threats to our ecosystem that has the potential to destabilize life as we know it. As a new member of the Sierra Club, I will join forces with those who oppose the senseless contamination of our natural resources for personal gain.
My focus on our environment runs deep.  Michigan has the largest source of fresh water in North America, yet our lakes are being polluted at an alarming rate.  It is our ecosystem. Our ecosystem supports all life. But it's more than having fresh drinking water, and soil that can produce food that is not genetically modified. It is our entire economic system.
Our ecosystem supports our marine life.  Our marine life supports our fishing and tourist industries. Our inland lakes and rivers are contaminated and many of the corporations are not held accountable.  The water in the Flint River was contaminated by local industries. Now, over 100,000 residents are permanently affected by a selfish decision to switch the drinking water from a reliable source to one of the high lead levels.  Contamination of our soil from fracking combined with polluting our lakes, rivers, and streams leave little for our future generations. 
I was part of a group of volunteers who took bottled water to Flint. Our group went into the poorest sections of Flint to find that they had not received water.  I was touched very deeply when I saw a cat looking for water to drink. Did anyone put any thought into how one failed legislative decision would affect generations of life? Are the legislators thinking about how their decision to stop bottled water distribution in Flint will affect the people now? Does anyone in our state know how safe their drinking water is?  Who is making these decisions, and why are they not being held accountable? Our residents in Michigan deserve better.
I've always opposed fracking because of the destabilization of our geological rock formation resulting in earthquakes.  There are more threats to our ecosystem that has the potential to destabilize life as we know it. As a new member of the Sierra Club, I will join forces with those who oppose the senseless contamination of our natural resources for personal gain.
 I found it interesting that I had to dodge a gauntlet of potholes for 84 miles on I-75 to the Ohio state line.  However, once I crossed into Ohio, the roads were maintained. In a recent conversation with Representative Tim Greimel -D 29, I learned that Democratic attempts to fix our roads and infrastructure were being held up in the legislature.  I found this unacceptable because I suffered damage to my vehicle with the relentless potholes in my community.
 
Each spring, thousands of Michigan residents suffer damage to their vehicles, yet we are still paying taxes! Our roads are bad, but our bridges and piping in our state are in the same condition.  Do we really know the true state of our infrastructure? Do we know whether or not our drinking water contains impurities? Thousands of jobs could be gained if funding was made available to fix our crumbling infrastructure. I am in the process researching the state of Michigan's infrastructure, the legislation currently in process, and the outcomes of those policies.